Skier Stories

Green Chile and Cold Brews

By: Martin H. Jones, PhD, aka “The Professor” | March 6, 2017   Eating at ski resorts can often be expensive with rather generic food offerings. In New Mexico, you can get a large meal for under $15, or cheaper, with the state’s unique take on cuisine. Then, wash it down with a cold local craft brew and grab a Taos bar for your mid-ski snack. What is Green Chile? Somewhere between smoke and heat resides green chile – a pepper that is a…

All Are Welcome: New Mexico’s Adaptive Sports Program

By: Martin H. Jones, PhD, aka “The Professor” | February 20, 2017 New Mexico has resources for all types of skiers including those with physical and cognitive impairments. Everybody is welcome to feel the joy of skiing New Mexico’s sunny slopes. Vests Vests. Orange Vests. Not hunter orange, but the subtle orange of a late autumn pumpkin. From 20 feet above the ground, I can see orange vest after orange vest. Contrasting against the pearl white snow, the vests stand out, but the number…

It's Different Up Here

By: Kent Wilhelmi | January 30, 2017 We're perched atop the summit of Pajarito Mountain, high above the sleepy, post-nuclear town of Los Alamos, when Dianne finally allows her disbelief to be suspended. This is my partner's first visit to New Mexico, and while she's attempting, perhaps in vain, to wrap her head around the place – I think it's all beginning to sink in. We're fortunate to be in Santa Fe for a week on a business trip,…

Après Japanese-style in Santa Fe

By: Shane Jones | January 30, 2017 If you ask ANYONE that has ever been skiing in Japan what their favorite aspect of the trip other than the skiing was, the odds are that “onsens” (hot springs / baths - typically used after day of skiing) would be included in their response, i.e.; how they were a quintessential part of the experience, how you weren’t allowed to wear bathing suits, how relaxing they were, etc. I can certainly attest…

3 Reasons We Love RRSA

By: Kelsie Stelting | January 23, 2017 Red River Ski & Summer Area is a not-so hidden gem in the southern Rockies. Not only is Red River a great place to go skiing or snowboarding with 18 feet of snow each year and trails appropriate for all levels, but there are plenty of other things to love as well. Here are three reasons why we love Red River. Quiet Town Red River is the hometown everyone wishes they had.…

Snowboard Lesson at RRSA

By: Kelsie Stelting | January 16, 2017 “If you don’t do it this year, you’ll be one year older when you do.” – Warren Miller Where was Warren Miller when I was sitting at the top of a gentle slope trying to figure out how in the world to stand up with both feet strapped to a snowboard? See, this weekend at Red River Ski & Summer Area, two other adult students and myself learned to snowboard. One had…

5 Things to Know Before a Lesson

By: Kelsie Stelting | January 16, 2017 A lesson is a crucial part of learning to ski or snowboard and for the most effective lesson possible, it is important to be prepared. Remember going to school for the first time? You couldn’t just show up and expect it to go well. You had to bring your supplies, dress well, and most importantly, have the right mindset to be successful. Snowboarding is much the same. Know the Lingo Do you…

Powder & Light - Skiing NM

By: Martin H. Jones, PhD, aka “The Professor” | January 9, 2017 New Mexico skiing means hitting the slopes with the same snow hitting other Rocky Mountain States, but with bright sunshine and less crowds. It Starts with a Rumor It starts with a rumor. The rumor grows to probability. Probability becomes hope. Calendars are checked. Schedules cleared. Meetings cancelled. Friends whisper through social media and across text messages. The approaching winter storm begins bearing down on New Mexico. The weather reports come in…

White Christmas at Ski Santa Fe

By: Monica Christofferson | December 19, 2016 Dispatch - Ski Santa Fe Xmas 2015 December 23rd  - 12” December 24th  - 18” December 25th  - 17” I was all set to fly out at 6:00 am on Christmas Eve to visit my family back home in Tulsa Oklahoma, but the moisture that everyone had been eyeing out West was now with within 24 hours of hitting the Sangres and there was reasonable certainty it was going to deliver more than just a…

The Turning of Kachina Peak

By: Martin H. Jones, PhD, aka “The Professor” | December 19, 2016 Standing at 12,480 feet above sea level, I completely forget how to turn.  My boots cement themselves against the 45-degree angle of Taos’ most famous mountain peak.  Signs warn that ski patrol will not drag me down the run because I’m scared.  The signs are also clear that this is advanced skiing.  I should know better, but now fear and anxiety swirl inside my head.  A voice echoes between my ears, “How…